PyLint and Pep8 validation in geany

If you’re into python, but don’t know about PEP8 or PyLint, you should find out right now. And because pep8 and pylint are great, but it’s hard to force yourself to use them all the time, lets integrate them into geany, a fast and lightweight IDE.

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Raspberry Pi Case DIY

I finally got myself a Raspberry Pi and it obviously needs a case. (By the way, it runs the ARM version of Arch Linux, naturally.) Of course I wanted to build one myself, rather than buying one of those boring cases that almost cost more than the device itself. I already had a vague idea about the concept but nothing solid yet. The concept had to be simple (but solid), because besides a Dremel and an electric drill I only had standard tools at hand. (You do not even need a Dremel if you have a small saw instead.)

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Poor man’s DynDNS – A PHP solution

I’m running a Thin-Client as a home server and sometimes I need access to some files at home. Since those no-ip services didn’t prove that reliable in the past, I decided to implement a DynDNS substitute in PHP.

The concept is quite simple: Let the little server at home call a PHP script somewhere on a “big” Server that has a static IP. The big server then writes the IP to a file, so it can be read from anywhere. There are two scripts that have to reside on the big server: an index.php, which reads and echoes the IP, that was recorded, and another script in a .htaccess protected folder, which is able to write the IP of the home server to a file.

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Android ADB over Bluetooth

Today I had no WiFi. And no USB cable. So I figured out a way to use ADB over bluetooth, because no one can stop me from developing an App. It is a rather simple hack, which should work on any rooted phone (or tablet).

All you need is a terminal emulator for android, and a bluetooth capable linux computer, of course.
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Archos Touchscreen Calibration Workaround for Archos 101

The Archos 101 has a crappy touch screen, as all the owners of this device already know. Most of the other problems could be fixed using a custom rom like urukdroid. But the touchscreen has been bugging me for the past year now: the touchscreen sometimes just acts weird (wild and random clicks, or almost no reaction), until it is “recalibrated”. No wonder, since it is a cheap USB touch screen “UNITEC USB Touch (Win7)”, probably made for windows 7 netbooks. Since the recalibration is hidden deep in the android settings, but needs regular access, I wrote a simple app as a “shortcut” to it. You can find the app download link at the end of the article.

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RAID5-Server to hold all your data – the NAS alternative with software RAID

This was an old project of mine. A few years ago I had a huge load of data comming in (~4 TiB) and the amount of storage I needed suddenly more than dubbled. Until then I was using two 1.5 TB HDDs which I mirrored by hand using rsync, because I’m paranoid of loosing data. It was annoying to always copy all data to each disk to have redundancy – and certainly not a smart solution. Now that data wouldn’t fit onto the two disks anyway, so it was time to think of a new solution. I had enough of wasting my time with copying files from one hard drive to another.

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Software keystoning with mplayer

Some years ago I built a projector, using a overhead prjector and a TFT, as most of you readers know them already. But I never did overcome the problem of keystoning. I know that you can tilt one of the lenses, but with most DIY builds this can be a quite frustrating procedure.

So after many years of looking for a solution thats easy to use, especially because I don’t want that ugly projector to keep standing in the middle of my living room and I always move it to one corner after using it. That means that i have to do the keystone calibration each and everytime I want to use it.

The solution: mplayer already has a perspective correction video filter feature included

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Cheap Home Server: Introducing the Thin-Server

A little while ago I finally made the decision that I would like to have a server at home and I was at first fascinated by the SheevaPlug, but many people complained that the powersupply of it would die within weeks, so I needed an alternative but I still didn’t want to use a regular computer because of several disadvantages;

  • It would be to loud
  • It would consume too much energy
  • It would be overkill for my purposes
  • The hardware is relatively expensive

But when I had a look on Ebay, I stumbled upon a Thin-Client, which is essentially a small, low power computer, that is used in companies as something like a next-generation terminal. Since it did only cost 50€ I thought I would just give it a try.

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