Repair the Syma X12S quadcopter by replacing the motors and rotor blades (and what to do if it does not lift off afterwards)

Syma X12S quadcopter with new motorsMy friend owns a Syma X12S quadcopter that was cheaply imported from China. It really is an amazing piece of hardware and the perfect entertainment when you spend an evening with friends. Piloting this miniature aircraft is quite easy – it only takes a few flying sessions until you acquired enough skills to handle it. However, I still managed to crash the quadcopter in a way that damaged two of its four motors. The beauty of this toy is its modular design: Even though it is a cheap product, most of the parts are LRUs, so you can simply order a replacement for the defect part and replace it yourself.
This short post shows how to replace the motors of a Syma X12S quadcopter and highlights some difficulties to look out for.

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DIY: Black Rolls/Trigger Point-like foam rollers for myofascial release

Black RollsFinished DIY version

I am a big fan of using foam rollers for myofascial release, especially after workout.

There are a lot of foam roller products for myofascial trigger point treatment out there, but I am too cheap to buy a piece of recycled plastic pressed into a cylindrical form for 20 EUR or higher. This is one of the easiest DIY projects possible, so make your own! Continue reading

Samsung Galaxy S3 repair – Glass screen/digitizer replacement and why it is not recommended

Glass screen replacedA friend asked me to repair her friends Samsung Galaxy S3 mobile phone, that had a broken glass screen/digitizer, so I had a closer look at it. The process of replacing the glass screen/digitizer on a Samsung Galaxy S3 is straight forward and not many tools are needed. However, what you really need is patience… a lot of it.

This post shows how it is done and why I still would not recommend it anyway.

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DIY: “barefoot”/natural running shoes

Finished sole

At the end of last year I went to a sports and health fair, where I wanted to have a closer look at the available natural running shoes, especially the ones from Vibram (FiveFingers) and Leguano. Both type of shoes were comfortable and seemed to be of good quality. However, with an above the 70 EUR price range, they are quite expensive for a shoe that aims to be like no shoe at all. In fact, they are more like a pair of high quality socks with a special thin rubber layer glued to the sole (whereas the Vibram FiveFingers also seem to have some supportive structure integrated, which is kind of a contradiction to the barefoot philosophy). Making a custom fitted version should not be that hard, so I decided to make my own.

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Building a simple goban (Go board) DIY

goban_asm-wgoban_asm-draftgoban-finished1

I am a big fan of the old Japanese board game Go. Some time ago I wanted to get my own Go game, consisting of a Go board (goban) and black and white stones. Unfortunately, I found out that wooden Go boards are quite expensive, by far exceeding the price range I was willing to pay. Actually, gobans are quite a simple piece of equipment. It is nothing more than a (wooden) board with a grid of 19 x 19 lines on it, why should I pay over 100 euro for it? So I decided to build my own and just buy the stones, which are cheap to come by.

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Raspberry Pi Case DIY

I finally got myself a Raspberry Pi and it obviously needs a case. (By the way, it runs the ARM version of Arch Linux, naturally.) Of course I wanted to build one myself, rather than buying one of those boring cases that almost cost more than the device itself. I already had a vague idea about the concept but nothing solid yet. The concept had to be simple (but solid), because besides a Dremel and an electric drill I only had standard tools at hand. (You do not even need a Dremel if you have a small saw instead.)

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DIY: Building a Japanese shoji-style ambient lamp – the nerd way

This is another old project that I made a while ago. I have to admit, the idea itself is stolen from instructables.com and you can see that the outcome looks similar at first glance. But I wanted to take a different approach. While I really like the shoji-design, I wanted my lamp to be more solid and long-lasting. Besides, I preferred the size (and ratio) of the DIN-A4-format, so that I can easily replace the paper without trimming it first, in case it gets damaged or i want to change the color. It has a beautiful ratio (297 / 210 = √2). The length of the sticks within the frame are chosen in a way that the rectangular pattern on the frame also has a ratio of √2.

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