Homeserver Upgrade: Odroid XU3-Lite Setup on a SD-Card

I recently bought a new home server, the Odroid XU3-Lite to replace my poor man’s home server I called the thin-server, to run CherryMusic and the like.

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That little ARM machine is a beast in the size of a cigarette pack, featuring a total of eight CPU cores, an ethernet port and most importantly an USB 3.0 port to connect an external hard drive. It also comes with a plastic case, with a small fan inside and a PSU that is strong enough to power external hard drives connected to the USB ports. I ordered the smaller “Lite” version, which has a slightly lower CPU clock rate, but costs a lot less than its bigger brother.

In this post I’ll guide you quickly through the installation process of the ubuntu image on a micro SD-Card, how to make use of all the space on the microSD card and how to secure this little fellow a little after the installation of the image.

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How to install and configure CherryMusic on a Debian Wheezy (headless) server

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This guide explains how to correctly — and more importantly cleanly — install CherryMusic on a (headless) server running Debian Wheezy — without polluting the operating system in any way. For Arch Linux or a more generic installation see the CherryMusic Arch Linux wiki page and CherryMusic’s own wiki on GitHub.

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Raspberry Pi Case DIY

I finally got myself a Raspberry Pi and it obviously needs a case. (By the way, it runs the ARM version of Arch Linux, naturally.) Of course I wanted to build one myself, rather than buying one of those boring cases that almost cost more than the device itself. I already had a vague idea about the concept but nothing solid yet. The concept had to be simple (but solid), because besides a Dremel and an electric drill I only had standard tools at hand. (You do not even need a Dremel if you have a small saw instead.)

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CherryMusic – A Music Streaming server for your browser

This post is quite old. CherryMusic has improved a lot since then. For the latest version and information on CherryMusic, please visit http://fomori.org/cherrymusic


I recently wrote a Music Streaming Server in python, that allows you to listen to your music inside a browser, no matter where you are. It is called CherryMusic and features a standalone webserver based on cherryPy as well as JPlayer, a HTML5/Flash music player. It indexes your data for fast search using a sqlite database, so there is nothing to setup for you, just download the sources and off it goes!

In my tests it works perfectly with many thousand indexed files: searches are returned immediately, even on my  little home server.

You can download the sources from github or download them directly from the projects page. Any suggestions for improvement are welcome.

After the break you can find some screenshots of it in action.

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RAID5-Server to hold all your data – the NAS alternative with software RAID

This was an old project of mine. A few years ago I had a huge load of data comming in (~4 TiB) and the amount of storage I needed suddenly more than dubbled. Until then I was using two 1.5 TB HDDs which I mirrored by hand using rsync, because I’m paranoid of loosing data. It was annoying to always copy all data to each disk to have redundancy – and certainly not a smart solution. Now that data wouldn’t fit onto the two disks anyway, so it was time to think of a new solution. I had enough of wasting my time with copying files from one hard drive to another.

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Cheap Home Server: Introducing the Thin-Server

A little while ago I finally made the decision that I would like to have a server at home and I was at first fascinated by the SheevaPlug, but many people complained that the powersupply of it would die within weeks, so I needed an alternative but I still didn’t want to use a regular computer because of several disadvantages;

  • It would be to loud
  • It would consume too much energy
  • It would be overkill for my purposes
  • The hardware is relatively expensive

But when I had a look on Ebay, I stumbled upon a Thin-Client, which is essentially a small, low power computer, that is used in companies as something like a next-generation terminal. Since it did only cost 50€ I thought I would just give it a try.

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